The Polkadot Scrapbook, Part 1

My grandmother, Gladys Corinne Walker, was born in 1897.    She grew up on a farm in Argyle, Michigan and moved to Seattle at age 18, and she created this scrapbook during the 1920s and perhaps beyond.  The previous two scrapbooks were assembled in large repurposed catalogs on heavy paper.  For this one, she bought a ready made paper book.

  Let’s leaf through page by page together, taking a closer look at especially interesting pictures.

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Google images tells me this is a Paula Kantala McAndrews scrapbook.  At first, I thought she was the cover artist.  Then I realized I had found a jackpot of a site featuring the scrapbooks she had assembled!  That helps me perhaps place the time when my grandma may have been assembling hers.  “The scrapbook featured in this digital library was created by Paula Kantala McAndrews to remember her four years at Simmons College as a student at the School of Secretarial Studies, from 1928 to 1932.

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It is this big!

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This first picture has a stamp from Standard Furniture, where she was an elevator operator.   I wish I knew which years she worked there; I know that by World War II, she was an elevator operator in the Seattle Federal Building, so that places this book as probably having been assembled before then.  The dates on a few of the photos do not necessarily place when the book was made, as she may have kept old magazines for scrapbooking.

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I’m sharing every page, interesting (t0 me) or not!

My grandmother was an excellent cook, and liked to save pictures of delectable food.

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She loved vintage stoves.
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The books assembled in the 20s abound with small black and white illustrations.  I wonder if they were used as page fillers in a publication like Ladies Home Journal.  I pored over these scrapbooks for hours as a child, which may be why I have always so loved the tiny black and white illos in the New Yorker.

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beachscene

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Regarding the photo in the lower left:  “Adelina Patti (10 February 1843 – 27 September 1919)[1] was a highly acclaimed 19th-century opera singer, earning huge fees at the height of her career in the music capitals of Europe and America. She first sang in public as a child in 1851, and gave her last performance before an audience in 1914.” (Wikipedia)

 

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